New Video of Dzokhar Tsarnaev's Capture Released

As Dzokhar Tsarnaev recovers in the same Massachusetts hospital as some Boston Marathon bombing victims, authorities released a new aerial video showing how they were able to take the suspect into custody alive.

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A bird's-eye view of the moments before Tsarnaev's capture gave authorities an idea of what to expect as they methodically closed in on the Boston Marathon bombings suspect, who was hunkered down in a boat in a Watertown, Mass., backyard.

Police believe Tsarnaev was initially wounded Thursday night in the gun battle that ended in his brother's death. Police said they found blood in a car he abandoned and blood at a house.

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A thermal-imaging camera showed Tsarnaev was able to move around inside the boat, as the FBI SWAT team brought in a robotic device to approach the boat and peel back a tarp, giving authorities a clear view of the suspect.

At least two flash grenades were thrown into the boat, designed to disorient Tsarnaev, who authorities feared might have been wearing a suicide vest.

They were then able to move in, rushing Tsarnaev to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for treatment, where he has remained under heavy guard. He was not wearing a vest.

It was unclear whether he was hit by a final exchange of gunfire Friday.

Tsarnaev is in the same hospital where his brother, Tamerlan, 26, was brought early Friday after a shootout with police. Tamerlan died of his wounds.

Investigators, who are expected to include the country's elite counterterrorism unit, are hoping that Tsarnaev survives because they are intent on determining what triggered his and his brother's alleged involvement in the attack and whether they had any help.

The bombing killed three, including a young boy, and wounded about 170. An MIT security officer was allegedly killed by the duo Wednesday night and a Boston transit cop was badly wounded in a subsequent shootout.

One focus of the probe so far is a six-month trip Tamerlan Tsarnaev took to the semi autonomous Russian province of Dagestan in 2012. Dagestan has become a hotbed of militant Islamic activity.

The FBI acknowledged it interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev at the request of Russian authorities, but after looking at his phone records, websites he visited and associates, the FBI found he had no ties to terror.

Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, the suspects' mother, said her sons couldn't be responsible for the Boston Marathon bombings because Tamerlan had been on the FBI's radar.

"My son would never do this. It is a set up," she said. "He was controlled by FBI like for five, three, five years. They knew what my son was doing."

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After Tamerlan Tsarnaev had been checked out, FBI officials said the monitoring had to stop by law because they found nothing incriminating.

"There are too many people in this country just like him that are touching extremist websites that are espousing things that aren't particularly kind to Americans. But that's not against the law here," ABC News consultant and former FBI special agent Brad Garrett said.

After a week of tragedy, terror and living on edge, the greater Boston area is finally breathing a sigh of relief.

"We got our guy and very proud of it and we want Watertown to back to normal; we want Boston to go back to normal," Watertown Chief of Police Edward Deveau told ABC News.

At a Red Sox game on Saturday, fans filled Fenway Park with their voices, singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" in unison.

They applauded for law enforcement, they mourned the victims of the bombings and they showed their resilient spirit.

"We are one. We are strong. We are Boston. We are Boston strong," the announcer said to an eruption of cheers.

The Red Sox later pulled out a spirit-boosting win.

And America hasn't forgotten about David Henneberry, the man who tipped police off that Tsarnaev was hiding in his boat.

Bullets riddled the blood-stained vessel during a final volley of gunfire between Tsarnaev and law enforcement. Henneberry is being regarded as a hero, and people around the country are sending him checks to put toward a new boat.

Deborah Newberry, 62, of Orlando, Fla., told ABCNews.com she mailed a $25 check to Henneberry's home.

"Just listening to his coolness and how he handled the situation, it was like OK, that is a man who needs to have his boat restored," she said.

ABC News' Anthony Castellano, Aaron Katersky and Christina Ng contributed to this report.

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