When Quintuplets Go to College: The Diaz Family

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Diaz Quintuplets Go To College

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Diaz Quintuplets Go To College

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Imagine the emptiness of your home after one child leaves for college. Imagine the chaos beforehand of getting that one child ready to leave for college.

Then multiply that times five and you have the whirlwind of life for Jorge and Enna Diaz as they dropped their quintuplets – Emilio, George, John, Maria and Enna – off at college Sunday.

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(Courtesy Jorge Diaz)

(Courtesy Jorge Diaz)

“We started the process back in December,” Jorge Diaz told ABC News. “Sending one kid to college is very difficult, make it five and that was a little bit of a challenge.”

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Making things a bit easier for their parents, the Diaz quintuplets all chose to attend the same college – University of North Texas – that is just 55 miles from their Denton, Texas, home.

The siblings, along with their younger brother, Sebastian, 13, made the drive Sunday with their parents for move-in day before classes begin next Monday.

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(Courtesy Jorge Diaz)

(Courtesy Jorge Diaz)

“It’s like an empty house,” Diaz said of life today without the siblings. “It’s quiet.”

Just as they did at home, the two girls – Maria and Enna - will share a room on one side of an on-campus dormitory, while the three boys - Emilio, George and John - will share a space on the other side of the same dorm.

Diaz says it was never a question of whether the siblings would each attend college, but their landing at the same one came as a nice coincidence thanks to North Texas’s many curricula.

“We’re from Mexico and that’s the way that we were raised, that you go to college and try to get your master’s [degree],” Diaz said. “That’s what we told them all the time.”

Enna, the oldest quintuplet, wants to go to medical school while her three brothers each have separate interests within the School of Business. Maria, the youngest of the five siblings, wants to pursue art design, according to her father.

The Diaz family is footing the bill for the quintuplets’ education, according to Diaz, with the help of student loans, just as they have provided for them their whole lives.“It’s always been on my paycheck,” said Diaz, who works in sales for a major baked foods company.

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(Courtesy Jorge Diaz)

(Courtesy Jorge Diaz)

Helping ease the transition from a family of eight at home to a family of three, according to Diaz, is the siblings’ closeness.

“It’s a good feeling that they’re together, that they can watch each other,” he said. “Enna is going to have a lab from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. and we asked one of the boys to go and escort her so she’s not alone.”

While all the attention has been on the five siblings, it is perhaps their youngest brother still at home, 13-year-old Sebastian, for whom life will change the most.

“Sebastian has all the attention from mom,” Diaz said.

 

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