Stranded Whale-Watchers In Good Spirits After Night at Sea

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Stranded Whale-Watchers Finally Reach Shore in Boston

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Stranded Whale-Watchers Finally Reach Shore in Boston

Stranded Whale-Watchers Finally Reach Shore in Boston
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Whale Watchers Stranded Overnight Off Boston Coast

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Whale Watchers Stranded Overnight Off Boston Coast

Passengers who were stranded overnight on a whale watching boat say they're exhausted but just happy to be back on land today. One even enjoyed the sunrise.

More than 160 people were aboard the boat, part of a three hour whale-watching trip with Boston Harbor Cruises. They were given blankets and food when the ship's propeller got tangled in a tagline, forcing them to spend the night at sea, passengers told ABC News.

One woman from Michigan said she got sea sick and couldn't eat, but wasn't angry at the company -- just tired.

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The boat was stranded 13 miles off the coast of northern Massachusetts when one of its propellers became entangled in rope attached to a lobster trap. '

It was freed from the line early today and docked at Boston Harbor around 7:30 a.m. All of the passengers are all right, a Boston Harbor Cruises spokesperson said. Divers hired by the vessel's owner succeeded in freeing the boat, Coast Guard Petty Officer MyeongHi Clegg told The Associated Press.

"They were able to untangle the line from the propeller," said Clegg.

The vessel would be escorted back to shore by two Coast Guard cutters, but would be operating under only one propeller since the other was damaged in the incident, Clegg said.

As they made their way home, most passengers seemed to be in good spirits. "We saw whales. It was a beautiful sunrise. It was a beautiful sunset," one passenger told ABC News' affiliate WCVB.

The group was originally supposed to return at about 4:30 p.m. Monday, but the vessel, named the Cetacea, never made it back to shore. About 10 minutes into the return trip, the Cetacea got stuck.

The company is compensating passengers for their troubles. Each passenger will receive $500 in cash, a $100 gift card for another trip, and a full refund, about $50. The company will also pay to re-book any passengers who missed flights this morning.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

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